The Tea Pot Dome scandal and Trump Towers in Russia.

Sleeze in Washington is nothing new.  The worse was Harding who was plain oblivious to the actions around him.  He was associated with the Tea Pot Dome Oil Scandal.  Worse was his secretary of interior, Albert Bacon Fall.  He is accused but never convicted of murder.  He is convicted in a crooked affair with the selling of oil rights at the Dome.  The first cabinet official to go to jail. For the crime he served nine months.  So when you look at Washington you have got to realize that scheming and corruption are not new.  No  wonder the American public is fed up with the practices that go on there.  Trump is going down the path well worn of many who took advantage of their positions.  Nixon was not the first.  The well being of the country takes a back seat to the financial gain of privilege and position of power.  We align ourselves with dictators and the country will be stained with lies and deceit.  

 

The Teapot Dome Scandal was a bribery incident that took place in the United States from 1921 to 1922, during the administration of President Warren G. Harding. Secretary of the Interior Albert Bacon Fall had leased Navy petroleum reserves at Teapot Dome in Wyoming and two other locations in California to private oil companies at low rates without competitive bidding. In 1922 and 1923, the leases became the subject of a sensational investigation by Senator Thomas J. Walsh. Fall was later convicted of accepting bribes from the oil companies and became the first Cabinet member to go to prison. No person was ever convicted of paying the bribes, however.

Before the Watergate scandal, Teapot Dome was regarded as the “greatest and most sensational scandal in the history of American politics”.[1] The scandal damaged the public reputation of the Harding administration, which was already severely diminished by its controversial handling of the Great Railroad Strike of 1922 and the President’s veto of the Bonus Bill in 1922.

Albert Bacon Fall, (born Nov. 26, 1861, Frankfort, Ky., U.S.—died Nov. 30, 1944, El Paso, Texas), U.S. secretary of the interior under President Warren G. Harding; he was the first American to be convicted of a felony committed while holding a Cabinet post.

Fall had little formal schooling but studied law and, after moving to New Mexico Territory, began to practice in 1889. After a lengthy political career in New Mexico, he was elected to the U.S. Senate in 1912, serving until his appointment as secretary of the interior in 1921. He resigned from the Cabinet two years later and returned to New Mexico.

In 1924 a Senate investigation revealed that Fall had accepted a large bribe to lease to private oil interests, without competitive bidding, naval oil reserve lands in the Teapot Dome reserve in Wyoming and other reserves in California. He was convicted of bribery in 1929 and served nine months of a one-year prison sentence.

1896:

On February 1, 1896, Fountain and his eight-year-old son Henry disappeared near the White Sands on the way from Fall’s Three Rivers Ranch north of Tularosa to their home in Mesilla.

 

Albert Jennings Fountain (October 23, 1838 – disappeared February 1, 1896) was an attorney who served in the Texas Senate and the New Mexico House of Representatives. Following a purge of corruption among cattle rustlers that Fountain investigated and prosecuted, he and his eight-year-old son Henry disappeared near White Sands, New Mexico. Their bloodstained wagon and other evidence of an ambush were recovered, but the bodies were never discovered. Suspicion centered on two rival landowners, Oliver M. Lee and Albert B. Fall, but their involvement was never proved, and no charges were ever filed.

 

 

 

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