The yid in me. A few words of my language

 

Balabusta (Yiddish: בעל־הביתטע‎) is a Yiddish expression describing a good homemaker among Ashkenazi Jews. The Anglicized form is baleboste, and the term derives from the Hebrew term bá’alat habáyit, meaning “mistress of the house”. The masculine form is בעל־הביתbalebos, from Hebrew בַּעַל הַבַּיִתbá’al habáyit “master of the house”, of same origin as Baal.

Yenta :  Yiddish – Meddler, gossiper, meddlesome, busybody, nuisance. Mostly Judaic and female.

(n) a stupid, ignorant person; someone who doesn’t pay attention to anything going on; one who makes stupid remarks
chutzpah
Or khutspe. Nerve, extreme arrogance, brazen presumption. In English, chutzpah often connotes courage or confidence, but among Yiddish speakers, it is not a compliment.
Mazel Tov
Or mazltof. Literally “good luck,” (well, literally, “good constellation”) but it’s a congratulation for what just happened, not a hopeful wish for what might happen in the future. When someone gets married or has a child or graduates from college, this is what you say to them. It can also be used sarcastically to mean “it’s about time,” as in “It’s about time you finished school and stopped sponging off your parents.”
oy vey
Exclamation of dismay, grief, or exasperation. The phrase “oy vey iz mir” means “Oh, woe is me.” “Oy gevalt!” is like oy vey, but expresses fear, shock or amazement. When you realize you’re about to be hit by a car, this expression would be appropriate.
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