Believe the Russians because they will never lie to you.

Trotsky’s ideas formed the basis of Trotskyism, a major school of Marxist thought that opposes the theories of Stalinism. He was written out of the history books under Stalin, and was one of the few Soviet political figures who was not rehabilitated by the government under Nikita Khrushchev in the 1950s. It was not until the late 1980s that his books were released for publication in the Soviet Union, which dissolved a short time later.

 

On 20 August 1940, in his study, Trotsky was attacked by Ramón Mercader who used an ice axe as a weapon.[124] The blow to his head was bungled and failed to kill Trotsky instantly, as Mercader had intended. Witnesses stated that Trotsky spat on Mercader and began struggling fiercely with him, which resulted in Mercader’s hand being broken. Hearing the commotion, Trotsky’s bodyguards burst into the room and nearly killed Mercader, but Trotsky stopped them, laboriously stating that the assassin should be made to answer questions.[125] Trotsky was taken to a hospital, operated on, and survived for more than a day, dying at the age of 60 on 21 August 1940 as a result of loss of blood and shock.[126][127] Mercader later testified at his trial:

 

Trust the Russians.  Hell no? It is not worth our moral integrity to build a Trump Tower in Moscow.

Note he was written out of the history books.  Reminds you of 1984.  You will accept what is written on the internet as truth but in reality it is written by questionable sources.  As the movie The Thing states: Watch the skies! My point is watch your back.  Our freedoms are hanging by a thread.

 

First they came for the Socialists, and I did not speak out—
Because I was not a Socialist.

Then they came for the Trade Unionists, and I did not speak out—
Because I was not a Trade Unionist.

Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out—
Because I was not a Jew.

Then they came for me—and there was no one left to speak for me.

is a poem written by German Lutheran pastor Martin Niemöller (1892–1984). It is about the cowardice of German intellectuals following the Nazis‘ rise to power and subsequent purging of their chosen targets, group after group. Many variations and adaptations in the spirit of the original have been published in the English language. It deals with themes of persecution, guilt and responsibility.

 

First he insulted the Mexicans but I did not speak out—

Because I am not a Mexican.

 

Then he insulted women and I did not speak out—

Because I am not a woman.

 

Then he insulted me and no one spoke out—

Because there was no one left.

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